Design by Darryl Carter, via Mark D. Sikes
Photography by Susan Sully for Houses with Charm: Simple Southern Style, Rizzoli New York, 2013

Photography by Susan Sully for Houses with Charm: Simple Southern Style, Rizzoli New York, 2013

Design by Pom Shillingford, photograph by John Gruen for Country Living

Design by Pom Shillingford, photograph by John Gruen for Country Living

PInk in interior decorating - Design by Rita Gleason, photograph by Roger Davies for Architectural Digest

PInk in interior decorating - Design by Rita Gleason, photograph by Roger Davies for Architectural Digest

Design by LeSueur Interiors
Sofa So Good?

I’m having a sofa dilemma.

I found a really great leather sofa for a really great price.  That may not sound like a big deal, but I really like the idea of a leather sofa (easy to clean, being one of the biggest pros.)  But I’m super duper picky on the look of a leather sofa.  Have you read Emily Henderson’s article on a good leather sofa?  Her analogy that a good leather sofa is like George Clooney, and a bad leather sofa is like The Situation is pretty accurate. Problem is, it’s a lot harder (and more expensive) to find a George Clooney sofa, so I haven’t even really bothered looking.

But this one’s pretty great.  I love the tailored arms, which keep it looking elegant, yet the seat itself is super comfortable!  It’s brown, which is my personal preference when it comes to leather; it’s not too intense.  I love the tone and variation of the leather.  It’s all, “hey, I’m real leather, so that’s cool,” and it’ll keep looking good as it wears.  And c’mon, nailhead detail?  Who doesn’t like some good nailhead detail? Not to mention it’s a really expensive sofa being sold cheaply as part of an estate sale.

So… the problem?  We already have a sofa.  Remember this ole’ labour of love?

It’s currently stored away, as the house we’re staying in is fully furnished.  I reupholstered this couch myself.  It is a great couch - it’s sturdy, comfortable, and I love how it has a subtle Swedish thing going on.  However, the fabric I used on it was a great big flop.  I ordered “outdoor fabric” thinking it would be all stain resistant, where in fact, it is sun fade resistant, but does not repel stains.  Worse, any kind of stain remover or stain guard just leaves stains.  Seriously.  (Lesson: ALWAYS get a sample first when ordering fabric online for a big project!  Always. Learn from Cheapy McCheaperson.)

Now it’s not looking quite as clean as it does in that photo.  It’s actually kinda’ gross looking.  So back in the fall I hunted down some really great silvery grey velvet for a good price.  (VELVET SOFA!!!  YAY!)

And my plan is to redo the frame, back, and welting cord of the sofa (which is the easier part for me), but send the cushions to the upholsterer so the whole thing can look and feel a bit more professional.

So.  Dilemma. Do I…

…Stick with a great sofa that we already have, but still need to put some money into to get the cushions recovered, AND it needs some time and work on my part (along with moving and having a baby this year)?

OR

…Buy a new, rare, leather sofa that’s good as-is for a great price (a couple hundred dollars more than recovering the cushions on the other one would cost) but we don’t NEED.

Gah!

I want both.  But I’m not sure they could coexist in the same room.  I love the look of two sofas facing each other in a living room seating arrangement, I’m just not sure these two would get along.  Their styles and scales are so different.  Could it be sophisticated juxtaposition, or just crazy?  I don’t know…

What would you do?

Home of Caroline and Anthony Borgman featured in Period Living

Home of Caroline and Anthony Borgman featured in Period Living


Amy Meier Design
Design by Nam Dang-Mitchell, Photograph by Colin Way for House & Home

Design by Nam Dang-Mitchell, Photograph by Colin Way for House & Home

Design by Orlando Dumond Soria
Designer Cristi Holcombe of Charm Home Design

Designer Cristi Holcombe of Charm Home Design

Design by Windsor Smith

Design by Windsor Smith


Design by Benjamin Dhong Interior Design, Photograph by David Duncan Livingston

Design by Benjamin Dhong Interior Design, Photograph by David Duncan Livingston